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The laws

The fine tuned universe
The big 4 theories
Gravity
Emergent patterns
Gauge symmetries

Albert Einstein, Einstein and Religion

Scientific research is based on the idea that everything that takes place is determined by laws of nature, and therefore this holds for the action of people. For this reason, a research scientist will hardly be inclined to believe that events could be influenced by a prayer, i.e. by a wish addressed to a Supernatural Being.

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  • The ocean floor is interesting. It's got ridges and valleys just like the surface, and just like these direct wind, the ocean floor would direct currents.
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  • Edit: it's not fractal. This writing was the result of not knowing enough about quantum mechanics!
  • What if the laws of nature themselves were fractal? Self-repeating at different scales, which accounts for the similar patterns at all of the different scales.
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  • And maybe dark energy is one of the 'others'?
  • This is assuming that the forces are all a kind of vibration and they differ from each other by strength. It may be more the case that the forces are the paths of least resistance when two kinds of matter begin to interact with each other.
  • The forces that impact a tornado are not the same forces as on a galaxy, but the pressures they exert are the same, but on a different scale. The forces themselves are fractally repeating.
  • An equation that describes these forces must reference itself.
  • Do the relative values of the forces follow a fractal pattern?
  • If not, are we looking at them the right way?
  • It might be a spectrum or other function. They are the same, but because of their different scales they are superficially different.
  • Wikipedia, String theory
    • In [some models of string theory], the force-carrying bosons of particle physics arise from open strings with endpoints attached to the four-dimensional subspace, while gravity arises from closed strings propagating through the larger ambient space.
  • …
  • The universe is blowing outwards like a balloon as the effect of the Big Bang. But galaxies, stars, planets, moons, just about all matter in the universe (at our current understanding) is just a formation that results from matter trying to get closer and closer together, but it's kicked around here and there by the some other very minor forces. A black hole is the ultimate of this closeness, and is the eventual fate of all matter. But this takes such a bloody long time that for now, solar systems can be said to be stable.
  • So when atoms get close enough due to massive amounts of gravitational pressure (remember that most atoms are either hydrogen and helium) they are catch each other with the strong and weak nuclear forces and fuse their nuclei, and release or absorb electromagnetic energy (depending on which side of iron they're on. More on electromagnetic energy later) and create some heavier atoms. When a star explodes, these atoms and unaffected hydrogen and helium cluster at the fringes of these fusion balls and bask in their energy. The moons and planets of the solar system bask in the energy playground of the sun. The atoms on these places still cluster together, but they're all moving around because of this energy coming from the sun or gravitational stress. Liquids mix together the atoms the best. When this happens, another force that wouldn’t otherwise have really been noticed comes into play.
  • Nuclear forces make matter combine, attract or repel in interesting ways to form molecules under the right circumstances. Electromagnetic forces energize or reduce their energy depending on if they're going in or out. Compared to helium and hydrogen, molecules are clearly rare in the universe.
  • That, amongst huge expanses of emptiness, is basically the whole story for the vast majority of the universe. However, there is a tiny little part of the universe where an interesting thing has happened. On a particular planet, a molecule formed that somehow managed to attract atoms and other molecules towards itself, so that they made more or less another copy of that molecule. They all made copies, and every now and then the design would be changed, and sometimes slightly improved. After a while they started building walls around themselves, and little molecule factories inside them so that they can replicate better. A planet to watch, it looks like.
  • …
  • Matter clumps up. The biggest clumps are the centres of galaxies, the great black holes. Around them are disks of clumps. inside the disks are smaller black holes and stars. Around them are rocky clumps. At this point the temperature and conditions may be right for molecules. One kind of molecule can replicate itself, how odd. It may get far, it may not. In the end well all end up in black holes or big crunches.
  • Then there's electromagnetic energy. The electromagnetic force is the one responsible for practically all the phenomena one encounters in daily life above the nuclear scale, with the exception of gravity.
  • …
  • These are just the forces we can perceive with our instruments. There are others beyond that.